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Rosa's Quest - The Way to the Beautiful Land

  Excerpt: OR THE WAY TO THE BEAUTIFUL LAND BY ANNA POTTER WRIGHT THE MOODY PRESS 153 Institute Place Chicago Copyright, 1904, by The Moody Bible Institute of Chicago Printed in United States of America. To my mother, who abides in the 'beautiful land,' I dedicate this, my first book. CONTENTS. CHAPTER.PAGE I. 'How Much is the Fare?'9 II. Esther's Perplexity19 III. Rosa's Mother Moves26 IV. Life with Mrs. Gray37 V. The Way Sought51 VI. The Way Found68 VII. Victory!91 VIII. Dust to Dust105 IX. 'A Little Child Shall Lead Them'112 Afterword121 I. 'HOW MUCH IS THE FARE?' 'Rosa! Rosa!' 'Yes'm, Mis' Gray, I'm coming.' 'Well, fer land sakes then, hurry up, you lazy girl! I've been a-hollerin' till my throat's sore. You're always underfoot when you ain't wanted, then when you are wanted, you're no place to be found. If you wuz my girl, you'd be learnt to know more'n you know now, I can tell you that. I believe in young uns amountin' to somethin', but it's mighty little you know.' 'But, Mis' Gray,' faltered poor little Rosa, 'mother was coughing awful, and I didn't hear you.' 'Yes, your ma ag'in. I don't know what you'll have fer an excuse when she's gone, or what'll become of you either. I know one thing, though; I won't have you. But it'd be a heap sight better fer you if I would, and a real blessin', too.' 'Why, where's mother going, Mis' Gray?' asked Rosa with wide-open and frightened eyes. 'There, there, Sary, don't talk to the child so! Never mind, Rosa dear, Sary don't mean it. Sary's a good woman, yes, a very good woman.' 'I do too mean it, father, and I jest want you to keep still. You always take her part. Yes, I am a good woman, or I'd never kep' you after poor Tom got killed. I have to sew my finger ends off to git us enough to eat and to pay the rent. I always did have bad luck from the day I married Tom Gray. He would insist on keepin' you, and you wuz sick that summer he couldn't git no work. He'd walk all day a-tryin' to find somethin' to do, then set...


POLLY AND ELEANOR

  CONTENTS: I Another Trip to Top Notch 1II The Claim-Jumpers 22III At Choko's Find 38IV John and His Friend Arrive 55V Polly and Eleanor Visit the Beavers 81VI The Girls Entertain Guests 99VII Several Momentous Letters 122VIII Polly-Eleanor Company, Inc. 143IX Jeb's Sunday Night Off 162X A Trip to Buffalo Park 181XI A Wild-West County Fair 195XII Nolla's Plans Develop 208XIII Riggley & Ratzger of New York 226XIV The Victory 247XV Comings and Goings 262XVI Polly and Eleanor Start Out 275 an excerpt from: CHAPTER I ANOTHER TRIP TO TOP NOTCH Six intensely interested individuals sat about the supper-table in the living room at Pebbly Pit Ranch-house, the evening of the day they rode to Oak Creek to file the claim on the gold mine. Sary, the maid-of-all-work, had the supper ready for the weary riders when they returned from their trip. Having served the dessert, Sary went out to the barn to help Jeb, the foreman on the ranch, with the horses which had just come in from the long day's work. So the group about the table felt free to talk as they liked. But Polly Brewster and her friend Eleanor Maynard were almost talked out by the time they finished the last bit of Sary's delicious dessert; and Barbara Maynard tried her best to hide a yawn behind her hand, while Anne Stewart, the pretty teacher who was the fourth member in the party that spent a night in the cave, was eager to continue planning for the future of the mine, but Nature demanded rest after the three days' excitement. Finally, Polly turned to her father and said: 'I wish we could see John's face when he reads that telegram!' 'If we had only dared word it plainly, there sure would be something queer to laugh at when John read it. But we had to cipher it, you know,' chuckled Sam Brewster. 'I can't see why such foolish fear of talking about it is entertained by all you folks,' declared Barbara, loftily. 'Can't you? Well, then, Bob, Ah'll tell you plainly that that message had to be camouflaged, as we are not taking any risks on having your claim jumped over night. If we sent a wire to John telling him plainly that you girls discovered a vein of gold on Top Notch Trail, every last rascal in Oak Creek would hit the trail before that message was delivered,' replied Mr. Brewster. 'Even as it is, I suppose every one who can read the records at Oak Creek will start out at once, so as to stake new claims as near to Montresor's Mine as possible; perhaps they'll try to pick up some nuggets from your claim, as well,' added Mrs. Brewster. 'Then, when word spreads around the country—and such news always travels like lightning—every gambler and bunco man in Wyoming and Colorado will be seen camping on Top Notch Trail, each trying in his own way to wheedle money or gold-dust from the unwary ones,' laughed Mr. Brewster. 'There now, Daddy! You've laughed, so I know your spell of worry is over with. Won't you tell us what made you so serious?' exclaimed Polly. 'Ah was trying to plan for the best way to avoid trouble over this claim; and at the same time protect our own rights, and any rights Old Montresor's family might have in this rediscovery. That is why Ah insisted upon Simms being one of our party, to-morrow; and the sheriff with his stalwart son, too. They are both strong, trusty men, and with Simms, Jeb and myself, we ought to be able to hold our own in case of an argument up there.' 'Oh, Mr. Brewster! Do you mean there is likely to be a fight, and shooting?' cried Barbara, horrified at the very idea. 'Not so that you-all can notice it—if we get there first. But let those claim-jumpers camp on our grounds first, and we-...


Polly of Pebbly Pit

  CONTENTS: I THE FARM IN PEBBLY PIT II A MOMENTOUS LETTER III PREPARING FOR THE UNKNOWN IV THE 'SERVANT PROBLEM' SOLVED V UNPLEASANT SURPRISES VI THE HARROWING DETAILS VII A LITTLE SCHEME THAT WORKED VIII ACCLIMATING THE CITY GIRLS IX SEVERAL MISUNDERSTANDINGS X THE DANCE AT BEAR FORKS XI IN THE WILDERNESS XII THE BLIZZARD ON GRIZZLY SLIDE XIII A NIGHT IN THE CAVE XIV OLD MONTRESOR'S LEGACY XV MONTRESOR'S CLAIM is JUSTIFIED XVI A YOUNG STRANGER IN OAK CREEK XVII SARY'S AMBITIONS an excerpt from CHAPTER I: THE FARM IN PEBBLY PIT 'Polly! Poll-ee!' sounded musically from the direction of the kitchen doorway in a ranch-house, and reached Polly Brewster as she knelt beside her pet in the barn. 'Run outside and see what Maw wants, Poll,' said Mr. Brewster, who was working faithfully over the object of Polly's solicitous devotion. Obediently, Polly ran out and shaded her eyes as she gazed across the great depression of the volcanic crater which had made such a wonderful farm for the Brewsters. At the door of the long, squat homestead, stood Mrs. Brewster, waiting for an answer. The moment she saw Polly, she called: 'Din-ner-r's ready!' 'All right!' shouted the girl, waving her sun-bonnet to signify she had heard the message. Mrs. Brewster returned to the kitchen and Polly went back to her father's side. He glanced up as she entered the barn, and Polly replied to his questioning look. 'Maw said dinner's ready.' 'Well, Ah reckon Noddy's all right now, Poll,' said the rancher, as he stood up to stretch his tired muscles. 'I felt sure she would be, Paw,' returned Polly, positively. 'If only Jeb was about, now, Ah could leave him with Noddy, with directions about the medicine, till we-all get back from dinner,' mused Mr. Brewster, standing in the doorway to look about for Jeb. 'Why, Daddy! Do you suppose I'd leave Noddy with Jeb for a single moment? And just as we saved her life, too! I reckon not! I'll stop here myself and watch her,' declared Polly with finality, as she assumed the post vacated by her father, and held the little burro's fuzzy head upon her knees.

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